Games, Reviews/Previews

The Impossible Line – iPhone / iPad Review

Impossible Line iOS Walkthrough Gameplay Review 5

Draw a line and hit the target. The premise seems simple enough, no?

Actually, it is that simple – almost.

The latest iOS puzzle game from Chillingo challenges you to draw a line on the screen to hit the bullseye. Avoiding disappearing obstacles, moving objects and collecting keys is also the order of the day.

The objective in itself is more than simple enough, but with disappearing walls and obstacles that task can get a little bit trickier. You need to have at least some ability to remember exactly where the walls are in relation to getting to your target, and that’s where it can be deceptively addictive.

Impossible Line iOS Walkthrough Gameplay Review 1

The gameplay style is obviously very casual. It’s very much in the category of pick up and play and put down again, as are most of the iOS titles, and it is absolutely fine for what it is.

It poses a little bit more of a challenge than your avwerage pick up and play iOS title, and of course has in app purchases.

This is where one of my biggest bones of contention comes with the game. The game is, of course, a freemium game. It costs absolutely nothing to play. Which is why, every few levels, you get advertisements. For a mere purchase of £1.49 you can turn them off. For some reason, this particular in app purchase just doesn’t sit well with me. It is entirely at the players discretion whether or not they choose to buy this, but for me, that seems like a rather cheap way of making revenue. Or maybe I’m just a grumpy gamer. That’s also likely.

Impossible Line iOS Walkthrough Gameplay Review 2

You can also buy in game coins, ranging from £1.99 all the way up to £13.99 for 1250 in game coins to buy hints and flashlights to see the invisible walls.

It is nothing groundbreaking. It is merely a simple puzzle game designed to while away a few minutes here and there, maybe on a bus journey, maybe on a train journey  and for all intents and purposes it does its job.

Just don’t expect any huge innovation or anything astonishing, and you won’t be disappointed. It is what it is, and it is not apologetic about that fact, and for that sake alone it is worth a look, and maybe even the odd play around here and there when you are in need of a quick distraction. With 200 unique levels, you really don’t have anything to lose.

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Jonas Alexander